Stanford Faculty Series: Five Recent Surprising Discoveries about Longevity

March 15, 2019 Erik UZUREAU

There is no shortage of headlines about how to live healthier and longer, and myriad products and programs promise to give one extra years of life. Professor Rehkopf discussed what laboratory and epidemiological studies over the past decade have taught us about what is most likely to be true and what isn’t, focusing on what he consider to be the five most surprising and important recent discoveries.

For more details, see 19_Rehkopf_StanfordFrance_longevity

Professor David Rehkopf

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE (PRIMARY CARE AND POPULATION HEALTH) AND, BY COURTESY, OF HEALTH RESEARCH AND POLICY (EPIDEMIOLOGY)

Professor Rehkopf's work focuses on the way in which social and economic factors impact health and mortality across the lifespan, with particular attention to the impact of work and earnings on cardiovascular biomarkers and obesity. He completed his dissertation at the Harvard School of Public Health in March of 2006 in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health. His dissertation, entitled “The non-linear impacts of income on mortality, biomarkers and growth,” documents the ways in which higher income has different returns to health and human development depending on a household's position in the income distribution.